Greek

Archtrove travels to Athens – columns and civilisation

Architecture in Athens

Athens, the capital of Greece and the heart of Ancient Greece, is a powerful civilization and empire. The city, dominated by 5th-century landmarks, including the Acropolis, a hilltop citadel topped with ancient buildings like the Parthenon temple was the start of government as we know.

With equal measures of grunge and grace, Athens is a heady mix of history and edginess. Cultural and social life plays out amid, around and in ancient landmarks. The magnificent Acropolis, visible from almost every part of the city, reminds Greeks daily of their heritage and the city’s many transformations.

Although individuals have endured difficult circumstances since the start of the economic crisis in 2009, the city is on the rise. There is crackling energy in galleries, political debates and even on the walls of derelict buildings. This creates a lively urban bustle, but at the end of the day, Athenians build their own villages in the city, especially in open-air restaurants and bars where they linger for hours.

Beyond Athens, down the Attika peninsula, are more spectacular antiquities, such as the Temple of Poseidon at Sounion, as well as very good beaches, such as those near historic Marathon.

In the 5th Century BC, the culmination of Athens’ long, fascinating history – the city’s values and civilization acquired a universal significance. Over the years, a multitude of conquerors occupied Athens and erected unique, splendid monuments – a rare historical palimpsest. In 1834, it became the capital of the modern Greek state and in two centuries since it has become an attractive modern metropolis with unrivalled charm.

A large part of the town’s historic centre has been converted into a 3-kilometre pedestrian zone leading to the major archaeological sites reconstructing the ancient landscape.

The most characteristic monument of Ancient Greek architecture is the Parthenon, on the Acropolis Hill, also known as the sacred rock. It is one of Europe’s most enduring monuments built during the Classical period, in 448 BC over the site of an ancient sanctuary of goddess Athena.

Gallery

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Buildings in Athens

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