Architecture · England

Shropshire – the birthplace of the industrial revolution

Shropshire is a county in the West Midlands, England. It borders Powys and Wrexham in Wales, Cheshire, Staffordshire, Worcestershire and Herefordshire. The county’s population and the economy are centred on the main towns of Shrewsbury and Telford. The county has many market towns, including Whitchurch, Newport and Market Drayton.

The Ironbridge Gorge area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, covering Ironbridge, Coalbrookdale and a part of Madeley. There are other historic industrial sites in the county, such as at Shrewsbury, Broseley, Snailbeach and Highley, as well as the Union Canal.

The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty covers about a quarter of the county, mainly in the south. Shropshire is one of England’s most rural and sparsely populated counties, with a population density of 350 sq miles. The Wrekin is one of the most famous natural landmarks in the county, though the highest hills are the Clee Hills, Stiperstones and the Long Mynd. Wenlock Edge is another significant geographical and geological landmark. In the low-lying northwest of the county overlapping the border with Wales is the Fenn’s, Whixall and Bettisfield Mosses National Nature Reserve, one of the most important and best-preserved bogs in Britain. The River Severn, Great Britain’s longest river, runs through the county, exiting into Worcestershire via the Severn Valley. Shropshire is landlocked and with an area of 1,346 sq miles is England’s largest inland county. The county flower is the round-leaved sundew.

Key Highlights of Shropshire

In Ironbridge – the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution and one of two World Heritage Sites that bless the county – you will find, set within the gorgeous Severn Valley, 10 hands-on museums that will both enlighten and entertain.

Ludlow is not just beautiful it’s delicious! Its gastronomic capital sits within the famous Blue Remembered Hills of the south of the county and is a great place to find your inner foodie.

Much Wenlock, whose local games actually inspired the creation of the modern Olympics, offers an Olympic trail to explain this momentous achievement. Whilst the meres and canals of north Shropshire gives a gentle, more contemplative experience within a truly rural setting.

Gallery of Shropshire

Blog Posts of Shropshire

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