8 Reasons Why Archtrove Travels To Coventry

Coventry is home to three cathedrals and a naked Lady Godiva riding through the streets. It is the second largest city after Birmingham in the West Midlands. Usually it gets overlooked due to its post war look and and industrial feel. Although, this has made it a hub for motor companies. Most of Coventry was destroyed during World War II.

Now that’s changing, with Coventry being made the 2021 City of Culture.

1) COVENTRY CATHEDRALE

The current Coventry Cathedral was built after the 14th-century cathedral church of Saint Michael was destroyed by the Luftwaffe in the Coventry Blitz of 14 November 1940., leaving only the outer walls and spire. This makes it one of the newest Cathedrale’s in England.

@farhanaazleen

2) COVENTRY TRANSPORT MUSEUM

Another visitor attraction in the city centre is the free-to-enter Coventry Transport Museum, which has the largest collection of British-made road vehicles in the world. The museum received a refurbishment in 2004 which included the creation of a new entrance as part of the city’s Phoenix Initiative project.

@alhojaily

3) FARGO VILLAGE

The £5 million Fargo Village creative quarter shopping precinct was open in 2014 on Far Gosford Street. Since then it has become a hipster, millennial HQ in Coventry! With its industrial and artsy look with graffiti on the way and full of independent businesses. Each business gives a different look architecturally making it a beautiful aesthetic site

 

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4) HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

The church dates from the 12th century and is the only Medieval church in Coventry that is still complete.

@ross_the_photographist

5) OLD BLUE COAT SCHOOL

The Old Blue Coat School is a unique and historic building nestling between Priory Row and the new Phoenix Initiative in Coventry city centre. The current building dates from 1856, the actual school having been founded as the first Charity School for girls in Coventry in 1714.

 

6) THE WEAVERS HOUSE

In Spon Street, one of the most historic areas in Coventry, a terrace of six cottages built in 1455 has been brought back to life. One of the cottages has been restored to show how it would have looked in 1540. This shows how John Croke, a Coventry narrow-loom weaver and his family would have lived and worked. At the back of the Weaver’s House is a medieval garden showing the plants that would have been grown for food, flavouring, medicine and household use.

7) SWANSWELL GATE

Of the original twelve city gates, only two remain, Cook Street Gate and Swanswell Gate, also known in times gone by as Priory gate.

@tranquillista

8) UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS

Coventry has many univeristy buildings scattered in the city centre. Some accomodation, some academic, some modern, some dated.

@ross_the_photographist

Have I missed a couple, message below what you think?

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