Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

Archtrove Travels To Compton Verney – NT find

What Need to Know About ….. Compton Verney, Warwickshire

Compton Verney is a Grade I listed house built in 1714 by Richard Verney, 11th Baron Willoughby de Broke. It was first extensively extended by George Verney, 12th Baron Willoughby de Broke in the early 18th century and then remodelled and the interiors redesigned by Robert Adam for John Verney, the 14th baron, in the 1760s. It is set in more than 120 acres (0.49 km2) of parkland landscaped by Lancelot “Capability” Brown in 1769.

The house and its 5,079-acre (20.55 km2) estate was sold by Richard Greville Verney, the 19th baron, in 1921 to soap magnate Joseph Watson who was elevated to the peerage as 1st Baron Manton of Compton Verney only two months before his death in March 1922 from a heart attack whilst out hunting with the Warwickshire Foxhounds at nearby Upper Quinton. George Miles Watson, 2nd Baron Manton sold the property to Samuel Lamb. It was requisitioned by the Army during World War II and became vacant when the war ended.

In 1993 it was bought in a run-down state by the Peter Moores Foundation, a charity supporting music and the visual arts established by former Littlewoods chairman Sir Peter Moores. The property was restored to a gallery capable of hosting international exhibitions. Compton Verney Art Gallery is now run by Compton Verney House Trust, a registered charity.

The collections include Neapolitan art from 1600 to 1800; Northern European medieval art from 1450–1650; British portraits including paintings of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and Edward VI and works by Joshua Reynolds; Chinese bronzes including objects from the Neolithic and Shang periods; British folk art; and the Enid Marx / Margaret Lambert Collection of folk art from around the world which inspired the textile designs of 20th century artist Enid Marx.

Location of The Compton Verney

Compton Verney House is an 18th-century country mansion at Compton Verney near Kineton in Warwickshire, England, which has been converted to house the Compton Verney Art Gallery.

Gallery for Compton Verney

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Posted in Warwickshire

Archtrove Travels To Wollaton Hall – the beginning of batman

Wollaton Hall

Driving up the vast drive, and on a slight hill, you are met with a lusious green grass, with deers in the distance. The picture is like something out of a movie. To be precise, the Batman movie. This 16th century Elibethean Hall was used as the setting for the Batman Manor and its clear to see why.

Exterior of Wollaton Hall

Wollaton Hall was built in 1580 by Elizabethan architect Robert Smythson. Over the years it has undergone massive transformations in order to keep it at its peak. In 1702, the Duchess of Chandos recorded that some of the statuary, were brought from in Italy including the decorative gondola mooring rings carved in stone on the exterior walls. The building is of Ancaster stone from Lincolnshire.

There are also obvious French and Dutch influences. The exterior and hall have extensive and busy carved decoration, featuring strapwork and a profusion of decorative forms, as well as the window tracery of the upper floors.

 

Interior of Wollaton Hall

The floor plan has been said to derive from Serlio’s drawing of Giuliano da Majano’s Villa Poggio Reale near Naples of the late 15th century, with elevations derived from Hans Vredeman de Vries.

The building consists of a central block dominated by a hall three storeys high, with a stone screen at one end and galleries at either end. From this there are extensive views of the park and surrounding country. There are towers at each corner, projecting out from this top floor. At each corner of the house is a square pavilion of three storeys. Much of the basement storey is cut from the rock the house sits on.

 

 

Purpose

Its actual use, is as Nottingham Natural History Museum with the surrounding parkland used for sporting events and concert.

Gallery

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See more buildings in Nottinghamshire here.

See more buildings in England here.

 

 

Posted in England

Archtrove Travels To Nottinghamshire – Sherwood Forest and Wollaton Hall

Nottinghamshire is a county in the East Midlands of England, bordering South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west

Nottingham in Nottinghamshire

Nottingham is a city in central England’s Midlands region. It’s known for its role in the Robin Hood legend and for the hilltop Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery, rebuilt many times since the medieval era. In the Lace Market area, once the centre of the world’s lace industry, the Galleries of Justice Museum has crime-related exhibits. Wollaton Hall is an ornate Elizabethan mansion with gardens and a deer park.

History of Nottinghamshire

 Roman settlements are inevitable in this county, for example at Mansfield and forts such as at the Broxtowe Estate in Bilborough. However, there is evidence of Saxon settlement at the Broxtowe Estate, Oxton, near Nottingham, and Tuxford, east of Sherwood Forest. The name first occurs in 1016, but until 1568 the county was administratively united with Derbyshire, under a single Sheriff. In Norman times the county developed malting and woollen industries.

What To See in Nottinghamshire

It is famous for its involvement with the legend of Robin Hood. This is also the reason for the numbers of tourists who visit places like Sherwood Forest, City of Nottingham and the surrounding villages in Sherwood Forest. The ancestral home of the poet Lord Byron is also located here at Newstead Abbey,. It is now owned by Nottingham City Council and open to the public. As is the acclaimed author D. H. Lawrence, who was from Eastwood. Toton was the birthplace and home of English folk singer-songwriter Anne Briggs, well known for her song ‘Black Waterside’.

Gallery

Buildings to Visit in Nottinghamshire

Wollaton Hall

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Top 10 Buildings to See

Top 5 Areas to Visit

 

Posted in Italy

Archtrove travels to Rome – when in rome

Roman Architecture

When one thinks of Rome, classical and historical architecture springs to mind. Once, at the forefront of style, from its arches to its domes. The peak of Rome came as the decline of Greek civilisation allowing Rome to dominate the architecture world. What made Roman architecture stand out was because it not only looks beautiful to look at but practical to use focusing on both the exterior and the aesthetic value. As a result, it is one of the civilisations which had the greatest impact on art, building practices and urban planning across the centuries.

Classical Roman Architecture

Most of Rome’s building were made used concrete and brick. From the 1st century, the Romans began to copy to Greek, by using marble. Columns were also a big part of the classical architecture, some were in the form of statues called caryatids. Others were from the greek, the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian. Roman temples were usually built on raised podiums. many were fronted with a roofed porch with columns. 

Early Christian and Medieval Roman Architecture

The first Christian churches in Rome were based on the basilica. From the 10th century, most churches were built in the Romanesque style, which used rounded arches.  

Renaissance and Baroque Roman Architecture

Renaissance was built upon classical architecture. It revived the use of geometric proportions. Whereas Baroque did not, it broke the established rules, preferring grand decor over classicism. Some decorative forms that were added were cherubs and statues.

Colosseum

The amphitheatre, otherwise known as the Colosseum, is one of the most famous buildings in Rome and possibly the world especially as it is the largest amphitheatre of its time. It started in 72AD and finished in 80AD with a capacity for more 50,000 spectators. There were as many as 80 different entrances installed.

Modern Architecture in Rome

Rome is not thought of as a city from Modern Architecture but if you know where to look, it does appear.

A few iconic pieces include National Museum of the 21st century,  perfectly integrated the building into the urban fabric to interpret the potential of the new institution and equipping it with an extraordinary sequence of public spaces.

Then the Auditorium, The Auditorium is a multi-functional complex mainly dedicated to music. The structure is composed of three “harmonic cases” that seem to resemble three big beetles.

The Macro is the most important museum of contemporary art in Rome, designed by the French architect Odile Decq who converted the old block of the Peroni brewery into a dynamic modern building, mainly dedicated to promoting the contemporary Italian and international art.

Gallery

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Buildings in Rome

Colosseum

 
 
Posted in Italy

Archtrove travels to Italy – colosseum, columns, culture, carbs

Italian Architecture

Italy is the epitome of classical style. Steeped in equal amounts of tradition and elegance. Most commonly known for its arches and domes which were constructed during the ancient Roman times. This started the Renaissance architectural movement in the late 14th to 16th century, and being the homeland of Palladianism, a style of construction which inspired movements such as that of neoclassical architecture, and influenced the designs which noblemen built their country houses all over the world, notably in the western world. Italy also contains more World Heritage Sites than any other country in the world.

Range of Architecture

Italy has a very broad and diverse architectural style, which cannot be simply classified by period, but also by region, because of Italy’s division into several regional states until 1861. This has created a highly diverse and eclectic range in architectural designs. Every part of Italy brims with architectural wonders. Famous landmarks like the Tower of Pisa or the Trevi Fountain in Rome, the Duomo of Milan, and Florence cathedral seem to be around every corner in Italy.

Every Corner of Italy

Italy’s smaller cities offer just as much. Ravenna, which used to be the capital of the Western Roman Empire, is a great chance to see mosaics brought over from the Eastern Roman Empire in Byzantium. Every other year the Venice Biennale is the international showplace for all that’s happening in contemporary architecture.

Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome and the Italian Renaissance gave Italy a rich architectural heritage that influenced building design around the world. Palladian styles are resonated throughout the world. Palladio’s most famous architecture from the 1500s includes the Rotonda, Basilica Palladiana, and San Giorgio Maggiore all in Venice.

Modern Architecture in Italy

Italy isn’t all about old architecture. Italian modernism was ushered in by the likes of Aldo Rossi and Renzo Piano. International architects have also put their stamp, such as the MAXXI: National Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome by Zaha Hadid and the MACRO Addition in Rome by Odile Decq. In Milan, CityLife Milano, a planned community has been a collaborative project with Iraqi born Zaha Hadid, Japanese Arata Isozaki, and Polish Daniel Libeskind. There is something to satisfy every architectural interest.

 

 

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Cities to Visit in Italy

Rome

Sicily

 

 

Posted in Egypt

Archtrove travels to Alexandria – greece comes the egypt

Alexandrian Architecture

Alexandria was one of the greatest cities of the ancient world, founded by Alexander the Great. However, due to the uneven preservation and excavation of its monuments, it is also one of the most untouched. Egypt’s largest seaport was once a glorious cosmopolitan city, but now, a shadow of what it once was due to nationalism in the 1950s.

The Style of Alexandrian Architecture

Some say that it was the centre of architectural innovation with a wide variety of architectural and decorative innovations. This lead to the creation of an Alexandrian style, starting with the colossal Pharos Lighthouse – one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, which spread throughout the Mediterranean and affected the development of the monumental architecture for over a millennium.

Rome in Alexandrian Architecture

Many fragments of the city, through mosaic, ancient paintings and ruins, help to reconstruct the architectural beauties of these lost monuments, giving a sense of the city’s former architectural grandeur. Roman Theatre, Built in the 2nd century AD, this Roman amphitheatre has 13 semicircular tiers made of white and grey marble, with marble seats for up to 800 spectators, galleries and sections of mosaic-flooring.

Citadel

Citadel of Qaitbay, One of the icons of the city at a beautiful location, the fortress overlooks the Mediterranean Sea and the city itself, built in 1480 by Sultan Qaitbay on the site of the Pharos Lighthouse, to protect the city from the crusaders who used to attack the city by the sea. It was erected on the exact site of the famous Lighthouse of Alexandria. Now it’s a Maritime Museum.

Modern Architecture

That being said, today, architecture in Alexandria is not only a city full of ruins, it also holds a stunning modern library in tribute to being one of the first cities in the world to have a university. It is also trying to revive itself and become the cultural hub of Egypt. Compared to the rest of Egypt, this city showcases a calmer way of life with its harbour, eloquent Greek architecture and historical coffee shops.

Gallery

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Buildings in Alexandria

Citadel of Alexandria

Alexandria Library

Roman Ruins

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For more about Greek architecture click here

Posted in Malaysia

Archtrove travels to Borneo – forests and peace

Architecture in Borneo

Borneo is Malaysia’s hidden secret. When visiting Malaysia, most people stick to the mainland and never venture to Borneo, unless it is to look at the orangutans on the far side of the island. However, there is so much more to Borneo than meets the eye.

Location of Borneo

Straddling the equator and dominated by luscious rain forests, Borneo is the world’s third-biggest island. Its territory is positioned unevenly between the countries of Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia.

The two East Malaysian states Sabah and Sarawak, lie to the north, surrounding Brunei. While the Indonesian state of Kalimantan occupies most of central and southern Borneo.

Architecture Styles in Borneo

Within the cities, are located some beautiful pieces of architecture, enjoyed mostly by the locals. The influence is a mix of the countries that surround it and therefore merge into its own style. Although on an island, mud huts and derelict buildings are not what is shown, instead of elegant and carefully considered jewels are displayed.

Kuching

Kuching’s architectural heritage and historic Chinatown are well-preserved. Even though it lacks UNESCO protection, and there is scarcely a high-rise to spoil the skyline.

Kuching is defined by its historic waterfront, and walking along this promenade in the evening as it follows the Sarawak River is the best way to see the city. Across the water lie Malay kampongs, the colonial Fort Margherita and the White Rajah’s palace, both dwarfed by an immense modern parliament building resembling a golden sun.

Today the various court buildings are not in use and instead host exhibitions, as well as a fashion boutique, cafe and restaurant. Parallel to the waterfront runs Main Bazaar Street, lined with shops selling tribal handicrafts. The back streets behind form Kuching’s Chinatown, a maze of all sorts of knick-knacks, coffee shops, street food stalls, traditional handiwork, tailors, temples, and blacksmiths.

Gallery

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Cities to Visit

Sarawak

Kuching

Sabah

Sepilok

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Posted in France

Archtrove travels to France – chateaus and cathedrals

Architecture in France

France, the country of sophistication, whether in food, fashion or architecture, France has always been at the forefront of elegance. From chateaus to cathedrals, villas to lodges, the depth and breadth of this country can never be summed up in one style. Its most famous buildings are of course in Paris, the Notre Dame, Louvre and last but not least, the Eiffel Tower.

Landscape of France

Frances landscape ranges from mountain plateaux to lush farmlands, traditional villages to chic boulevards. France belongs to both the north and the south of Europe. Brittany with its maritime heritage, the Mediterranean Sunbelt, the Germanic Alsace-Lorraine, and the hardy mountain regions of Pyrenees.

Romanesque and Gothic

Over the centuries, France has been at the forefront of architectural innovation, rich in medieval architecture, ranging from Romanesque churches to Gothic cathedrals. France Romanesque buildings have thick walls, round arches and heavy vaults. French arch improved this and lead to the blossoming of the Gothic era in the 13th century. Pointed arches and flying buttresses were the key inventions that allowed for taller buildings with larger windows.

Renaissance

During the Renaissance, the French borrowed from the Italian to create lavish Chateaux. In the 1600s, the French brought exuberance to the elaborate Baroque style. Neoclassicism was popular in France until about 1840, followed by a revival of Gothic.

Beaux Arts, a new trend, was an elaborate, highly decorated fashion, inspired by many ideas from the past. Art Nouveau originated in France in the 1880s. Art Deco was born in Paris in 1925. Then came the various modern movements, with France solidly in the lead with the father of Modernism, Le Corbusier, whose work is reminiscent throughout France. 

Modern Architecture

Modern French architecture has just as much influence today as historic architecture does. France has also been at the forefront of modern architecture, with its innovative use of technology, from The Institut du Monde Arabe by Jean Nouvel to the Louis Vitton Foundation by Frank Gehry.

 

Gallery

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Cities to Visit

Paris

Nice

Monoco

Antibes

Cannes

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Posted in Egypt

Archtrove travels to Cairo – pyramids and pharaohs

Architecture in Cairo

Cairo, a congested city of millions of people crushing the city’s infrastructure under their weight and lifting its spirit up with their charm and humour. This sprawling capital, set on the Nile is the heart of Egypt, hence Egyptians call it Umm ad-Dunya – the Mother of the World. Within one taxi ride, you can pass stupendous mosques, grand avenues, and 19th-century palaces, with a far-away view of the pyramids of Giza.

Within the congested city are souks, markets selling everything and anything. At every turn sellers bartering through thier makeshift shops with an overflow of items.

At its heart is Tahrir Square and the vast Egyptian Museum, a trove of antiquities including mummies and King Tutankhamun artefacts. Nearby, Giza is the site of the iconic pyramids and Great Sphinx, dating to the 26th century BC. In Gezira Island’s leafy Zamalek district, 187m Cairo Tower affords panoramic city views.

History of Cairo

Cairo starts with the Fatimid architecture, developed in the Fatimid Caliphate combining elements of eastern and western architecture, it bridged early Islamic styles and the medieval architecture of the Mamluks of Egypt, introducing many innovations.

The heartland of architectural activity and expression during Fatimid rule was at al-Qahira, the old city of Cairo, on the eastern side of the Nile, where many of the palaces, mosques and other buildings were built.

 The Fatimid Caliphs competed with the rulers of the Abbasid and Byzantine empires and indulged in luxurious palace building. Notable extant examples of Fatimid architecture include the Great Mosque of Mahdiya, and the Al-Azhar Mosque, Al-Hakim Mosque, Juyushi and Lulua of Cairo.

City Walls of Cairo

A new city wall was built around Cairo on expanded beyond the original city walls, and the city faced threats from the east, notably by the Turkoman Atsiz ibn Uvaq, commander of the Seljuk army. In fact, the fortifications were never put to the test. Three of the gates in the new walls have survived: Bab al-Nasr, Bab al-Futuh and Bab Zuweila.

 

Gallery

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Architecture in Cairo

  • Al-Azhar Mosque
  • Cairo Museum
  • Pyramids of Giza
  • Great Sphinx
Posted in Malaysia

Archtrove travels to Kuala Lumpur – the hub of malaysia

Architecture in Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur is the capital of Malaysia. Its modern skyline is dominated by the Petronas Twin Towers, a pair of glass-and-steel-clad skyscrapers with Islamic motifs. The towers also offer a public sky bridge and observation deck. The city is also home to British colonial-era landmarks such as the Kuala Lumpur Railway Station and the Sultan Abdul Samad Building.

Influences in Kuala Lumpur

The city is a blend of old colonial influences, Asian traditions, Malay Islamic inspirations, modern and post-modern mix. Being a relatively young city, most of Kuala Lumpur’s colonial buildings were built toward the end of 19th and early 20th century. These buildings have Mughal, Tudor, Neo-Gothic or Grecian-Spanish style or architecture. Most of the styling has been modified to cater to use local resources and the acclimatized to the local climate, which is hot and humid all year around.

Independence in Malaysia

Independence coupled with the rapid economic growth from the 70’s to the 90’s, saw buildings with more local and Islamic motifs arise in the central districts of the city. Many of these buildings derive their design from traditional Malay items, such as the head-dress and the keris. Some of these buildings have Islamic geometric motifs integrated with the designs of the building, such as square patterns or a dome.

Modernist Architecture

Late Modernist and Post-Modernist style architecture began to appear in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Buildings with all-glass exteriors sprang up around the city, with the most prominent example being the Petronas Twin Towers As an emerging global city in a newly industrialized economy, the city skyline is expected to experience further changes in decades to come with construction works like The Gardens, The Pavilion, Four Seasons Place, Lot C of KLCC and many more.

 

 

Gallery

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Buildings in Kuala Lumpur

 

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Posted in Pakistan

Majestic Mahals – 10 Reasons To Visit Bahawalpur

Architecture in Bahawalpur

Bahawalpur, is a city located in the Punjab province of Pakistan. As it once was the home of many Nawabs, many stately homes are now left in its absence, mostly for government purposes, the most famous of this is Noor Mahal.

Noor Mahal

The Noor Mahal is a palace in Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan. It was built in 1872 like an Italian chateau on neoclassical lines, now it is co-owned by Sajid Ali Isar And Malik Farhan at a time when modernism had set in. It belonged to the Nawab of Bahawalpur princely state, during British Raj. Darbar Mahal will definitely take you back to the Ancient Mughalai Fort.

Cholistan Desert, Bahawalpur

The city also lies near the ancient Derawar Fort in the Cholistan Desert near the border with India, and serves as the gateway to Pakistan’s Lal Suhanra National Park. Visible from several miles in Cholistan desert, the majestic Derawar Fort is a sight not to miss. Another attraction is the replica of Moti Mosque in Delhi, called the Abbasi Mosque. You might want to go 73km out of Bahawalpur to visit this crumbling beauty: the Tomb of Bibi Jawindi in Uch Sharif. All the nawabs of Bahawalpur are buried in this royal graveyard in Cholistan desert. For more on Cholistan, click here

Gallery

 

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Cholistan Desert