Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

5 Buildings That Send Archtrove To Historical Birmingham

Birmingham, as a city has been around for a long time and therefore is no surprise has many historical buildings.

  1. Winterbourne House and Gardens

Winterbourne House and Garden are situated in leafy Edgbaston near the University of Birmingham. It is an early Edwardian 20th-century villa suburban house and garden set in 7 acres. A Grade II listed building, it has housed prominent families and has been known for its illustrious gardens.

2. Black Country Museum

An open-air museum based in Dudley, consisting of 26 acres of historic buildings including a former railway goods yard, canal arm, former coal pits and rebuilt historical buildings. Great for teaching children about the Victorian age what life would have been like.

3. Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum

This Victorian Baroque Museum, is a Grade II listed city centre landmark building housing over 40 galleries with collections, both locally and internationally, ranging from art to history. It first opened in 1885 and has since been famous for its Pre-Raphaelite paintings, the largest public collection in the world. It also reflects on local Birmingham history.

4. Soho House Museum

Soho House is a Grade II* listed 18th-century house in Handsworth. It was the home of Matthew Boulton until his death in 1809. It has now been restored and is now a museum, run by Birmingham Museums Trust, celebrating Boulton’s life and collection. It houses a collection of ormolu, silver, furniture and paintings.

5. Blakesley Hall

Blakesley Hall is a grade II* listed Tudor building in Yardley. It is one of the oldest buildings in Birmingham and is a typical example of Tudor architecture with the use of darkened timber and wattle-and-daub infill, with an external lime render which is painted white. The hall became a museum in 1935 after centuries of use as a private home and its parlour was renovated. Its purpose was to display the history of the local medieval manors which comprise Birmingham.

6. Selly Manor

Selly Manor is a timber cruck-framed, 14th-century building, in England, dating back to at least 1327. Originally the manor house of the village of Bournbrook in Worcestershire, it was relocated to the nearby Bournville district in the early 20th century. It is now operated as a museum and venue for functions including weddings, for which it is licensed. It houses the Laurence Cadbury furniture collection.

7. Highbury Hall

Highbury is a Grade II* listed building, was commissioned as his Birmingham residence by Joseph Chamberlain in 1878. It received its name from the Highbury area of London, where Chamberlain lived as a child. The house incorporates much terracotta decoration. Adjacent to the house was Chamberlain’s famous orchid houses. The gardens were magnificent and included a lake.

8. Council Hall

The Birmingham City Council House is located in Victoria Square in the city centre and is a Grade II* listed building. The side of the building, which faces Chamberlain Square, is the entrance and façade of the Museum and Art Gallery which is partly housed in the same building. It provides office accommodation for both employed council officers, including the Chief Executive, and elected council members, plus the council chamber, Lord Mayor’s Suite, committee rooms and a large and ornate banqueting suite, complete with minstrel’s gallery. The first-floor’s exterior balcony is used by visiting dignitaries and victorious sports teams, to address crowds assembled below.

9. St Philips Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Saint Philip is the Church of England cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Birmingham. Built as a parish church and consecrated in 1715, St Philip’s became the cathedral of the newly formed Diocese of Birmingham in 1905. St Philip’s was built in the early 18th century in the Baroque style by Thomas Archer and is located in Colmore Row, Birmingham, England. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building.

  1. Birmingham University

The University of Birmingham is a public research university located in Edgbaston. The main campus of the university occupies a site some 3 miles south-west of Birmingham city centre, in Edgbaston. It is arranged around Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower. Chamberlain may be considered the founder of Birmingham University and was largely responsible for the university gaining its Royal Charter in 1900 and for the development of the Edgbaston campus. The university’s Great Hall is located in the domed Aston Webb Building. The initial 25-acre site was given to the university in 1900 by Lord Calthorpe.

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Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

Archtrove Travels To Compton Verney – NT find

What Need to Know About ….. Compton Verney, Warwickshire

Compton Verney is a Grade I listed house built in 1714 by Richard Verney, 11th Baron Willoughby de Broke. It was first extensively extended by George Verney, 12th Baron Willoughby de Broke in the early 18th century and then remodelled and the interiors redesigned by Robert Adam for John Verney, the 14th baron, in the 1760s. It is set in more than 120 acres (0.49 km2) of parkland landscaped by Lancelot “Capability” Brown in 1769.

The house and its 5,079-acre (20.55 km2) estate was sold by Richard Greville Verney, the 19th baron, in 1921 to soap magnate Joseph Watson who was elevated to the peerage as 1st Baron Manton of Compton Verney only two months before his death in March 1922 from a heart attack whilst out hunting with the Warwickshire Foxhounds at nearby Upper Quinton. George Miles Watson, 2nd Baron Manton sold the property to Samuel Lamb. It was requisitioned by the Army during World War II and became vacant when the war ended.

In 1993 it was bought in a run-down state by the Peter Moores Foundation, a charity supporting music and the visual arts established by former Littlewoods chairman Sir Peter Moores. The property was restored to a gallery capable of hosting international exhibitions. Compton Verney Art Gallery is now run by Compton Verney House Trust, a registered charity.

The collections include Neapolitan art from 1600 to 1800; Northern European medieval art from 1450–1650; British portraits including paintings of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and Edward VI and works by Joshua Reynolds; Chinese bronzes including objects from the Neolithic and Shang periods; British folk art; and the Enid Marx / Margaret Lambert Collection of folk art from around the world which inspired the textile designs of 20th century artist Enid Marx.

Location of The Compton Verney

Compton Verney House is an 18th-century country mansion at Compton Verney near Kineton in Warwickshire, England, which has been converted to house the Compton Verney Art Gallery.

Gallery for Compton Verney

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Posted in England

Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire

Blenheim Palace is a monumental country house situated in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England. It is the principal residence of the Dukes of Marlborough, and the only non-royal non-episcopal country house in England to hold the title of palace. The palace, one of England’s largest houses, was built between 1705 and circa 1722. Blenheim Palace was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

What Need to Know About ….. Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire

  • The building of the palace was originally intended to be a reward to John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, from a grateful nation for the duke’s military triumphs against the French and Bavarians during the War of the Spanish Succession, culminating in the 1704 Battle of Blenheim. However, soon after its construction began, the palace became the subject of political infighting; this led to Marlborough’s exile, the fall from power of his duchess, and lasting damage to the reputation of the architect Sir John Vanbrugh.
  • Designed in the rare, and short-lived, English Baroque style, architectural appreciation of the palace is as divided today as it was in the 1720s. It is unique in its combined use as a family home, mausoleum and national monument. The palace is also notable as the birthplace and ancestral home of Sir Winston Churchill.
  • Following the palace’s completion, it became the home of the Churchill, later Spencer-Churchill, family for the next 300 years, and various members of the family have wrought changes to the interiors, park and gardens. At the end of the 19th century, the palace was saved from ruin by funds gained from the 9th Duke of Marlborough’s marriage to American railroad heiress Consuelo Vanderbilt. The exterior of the palace remains in good repair.

Location of Blenheim Palace

Blenheim Palace sits at the edge of the picturesque town of Woodstock in Oxfordshire and is a 20 minute journey from the city of Oxford. The Palace is also within easy reach of central London and Birmingham.

Gallery of Blenheim Palace

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