Posted in Architecture, Warwickshire

8 Reasons Why Archtrove Travels To Coventry

Coventry is home to three cathedrals and a naked Lady Godiva riding through the streets. It is the second largest city after Birmingham in the West Midlands. Usually it gets overlooked due to its post war look and and industrial feel. Although, this has made it a hub for motor companies. Most of Coventry was destroyed during World War II.

Now that’s changing, with Coventry being made the 2021 City of Culture.

1) COVENTRY CATHEDRALE

The current Coventry Cathedral was built after the 14th-century cathedral church of Saint Michael was destroyed by the Luftwaffe in the Coventry Blitz of 14 November 1940., leaving only the outer walls and spire. This makes it one of the newest Cathedrale’s in England.

@farhanaazleen

2) COVENTRY TRANSPORT MUSEUM

Another visitor attraction in the city centre is the free-to-enter Coventry Transport Museum, which has the largest collection of British-made road vehicles in the world. The museum received a refurbishment in 2004 which included the creation of a new entrance as part of the city’s Phoenix Initiative project.

@alhojaily

3) FARGO VILLAGE

The £5 million Fargo Village creative quarter shopping precinct was open in 2014 on Far Gosford Street. Since then it has become a hipster, millennial HQ in Coventry! With its industrial and artsy look with graffiti on the way and full of independent businesses. Each business gives a different look architecturally making it a beautiful aesthetic site

 

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4) HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

The church dates from the 12th century and is the only Medieval church in Coventry that is still complete.

@ross_the_photographist

5) OLD BLUE COAT SCHOOL

The Old Blue Coat School is a unique and historic building nestling between Priory Row and the new Phoenix Initiative in Coventry city centre. The current building dates from 1856, the actual school having been founded as the first Charity School for girls in Coventry in 1714.

 

6) THE WEAVERS HOUSE

In Spon Street, one of the most historic areas in Coventry, a terrace of six cottages built in 1455 has been brought back to life. One of the cottages has been restored to show how it would have looked in 1540. This shows how John Croke, a Coventry narrow-loom weaver and his family would have lived and worked. At the back of the Weaver’s House is a medieval garden showing the plants that would have been grown for food, flavouring, medicine and household use.

7) SWANSWELL GATE

Of the original twelve city gates, only two remain, Cook Street Gate and Swanswell Gate, also known in times gone by as Priory gate.

@tranquillista

8) UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS

Coventry has many univeristy buildings scattered in the city centre. Some accomodation, some academic, some modern, some dated.

@ross_the_photographist

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Posted in #, Architecture, Birmingham, England

15 Reasons Why Archtrove Travels To Birmingham

Birmingham, the second-largest city in England is often overlooked even though it has some of the best things to see and do which include, the home to Lord of The Rings, Cadburys Factory and the Industrial Revolution.

Most of the city’s architecture is relatively new, and expansion over the last 10 years has allowed some much-needed development to take place and that included some innovative suggestions including the first blobitecture to happen in the shape of the Selfridges building. It is also home to some iconic traditional buildings such as the Custard factory, Cadburys World and Birmingham University (including the Tower inspo in Lord of the Rings).

1) SELFRIDGES/BULLRING

One of the most iconic buildings in Birmingham (which has put it on the Architectural map) is the Selfridges building with its blobitecture with *THOSE* iconic round circles.

@fauxee

2 BIRMINGHAM LIBRARY

The Library of Birmingham is one of the most recent iconic buildings to define the city. With its striking circular facade, impressive interior and the largest library in Europe, its no wonder it is one of the best sites to see outside of London.

@timcornbill

3) CUSTARD FACTORY

An independent shopping destination and creative and digital business workspace location in Deritend Birmingham, England. Located on the site of what was the Bird’s Custard factory.

@shendergram

4) LORD OF THE RINGS TOWER/BIRMINGHAM UNIVERSITY

The Tower at the University was the inspiration for the Twin Towers in the JRR Tolkien books. The tower is still standing and has been for some time.

@lucy.burger

5) MAILBOX

A recent development comprising of shops and restaurants. This was the former site of the post office hence the name.

@oonamac

6) GRAND CENTRAL STATION
Designed by a Spanish architect, the grand central station replaces the old new street station. The revamp includes new eateries and shops.

 

7) BIRMINGHAM CATHEDRAL

Set in pigeon park, the cathedral is a monument to behold. People gather to sit in the park and centre themselves around the cathedral.

@joehortonglover

8) TOWN HALL

Birmingham Town Hall is a Grade I listed concert hall and venue for popular assemblies opened in 1834 and situated in Victoria Square.

@bowdermusic

9) THE CUBE

A 25 storey mixed-use development in the centre of Birmingham, England. It contains 135 flats, offices, shops, a hotel and a ‘skyline’ restaurant.

@amy.eliza.photography

10) GAS STREET BASIN

Gas Street Basin is a canal basin in the centre of Birmingham, England, where the Worcester and Birmingham Canal meets the BCN Main Line.

@timcornbill

11) MILLENIUM POINT

Millennium Point is a multi-use meeting complex in Birmingham. The building is constructed mainly as a cuboid, with a cylindrical offshoot holding the cinema. This annexe glows different colours at night.

@mohammedali6561

12) WINTERBOURNE HOUSE

Winterbourne Botanic Garden is the botanic garden of the University of Birmingham. Set in 7 acres, it is notable as a rare surviving example of an early 20th-century high-status suburban “villa” garden.

@sovictoria_

13) SELLY MANOR

Selly Manor is a timber-framed building in Bournville, that was moved to its current site in 1916 by the chocolate manufacturer and philanthropist George Cadbury.

@nainokhook

14) ASTON HALL

Aston Hall is a magnificent seventeenth-century red-brick mansion situated in a public park on the north side of Birmingham.

@edjames1

15) VICTORIAN LAW COURTS

The Victoria Law Courts is a Grade I listed red brick and terracotta building. The interior, including the Great Hall, is faced with sandy-yellow terracotta and intricate ornamentation.

@p.ret.zel

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Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

Archtrove Travels To Jewellery Quarter – Brums Hidden Gem

Historically the area of Jewellery Quarter has been the birthplace of many pioneering advancements in industrial technology but since the decline the area resulted in delapidation. One sector that has not declined in the jewellery sector, with numerous shops and a school and the name of course.

Its old school charn still exists in these derelict buildings and wonky roads some of which are protected through conservation work and are as a result grade listed, but some being transformed.

Transforming into a young urban hub for design and tech. And a film site ( ready player one).

Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

5 Transport Hubs Archtrove Finds In Birmingham

Birmingham is the second-largest city in England and located in the West Midlands region. Although it has multiple Industrial Revolution-era landmarks that speak to its 18th-century history as a manufacturing powerhouse. It’s also home to a network of canals. However, nowadays, people travel to Birmingham in different ways.

1) BIRMINGHAM AIRPORT

Birmingham Airport is an international airport flying to numerous destinations. It is located on the outskirts and serves the whole of the midlands, international.

2) BIRMINGHAM GRAND CENTRAL/ NEW STREET STATION

Grand Central is a shopping centre located above New Street railway station. Although the station has been around for a while, it has recently been revamped.

@picturetx

3) BIRMINGHAM COACH STATION

Birmingham Coach Station is a major coach interchange in Digbeth

 

4) CURZON STREET RAILWAY STATION

Birmingham Curzon Street railway station is the planned High Speed 2 terminus station in the city centre of Birmingham. It was once a former railway station.

@solarpatrick

5) MOOR ST STATION

Birmingham Moor Street is one of three main railway stations in the city centre of Birmingham, England.

@solarpatrick

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Posted in Architecture, England

Archtrove Travels To Ironbridge – The First Iron Bridge in the World

Ironbridge is a 30 metre cast iron bridge built across the River Severn in 1779. It sits in the village of Ironbridge in the heart of the gorge, in Shropshire. It is the longest bridge to made of Iron at the time and is therefore known as beginning of the industrial revolution. Now it is open for all to visit, as well as a museum and shop.

What Need to Know About ….. Ironbridge, Telford

  • Known as the Industrial Revolution due to the perfection of the technique of smelting iron with coke, in Coalbrookdale, allowing much cheaper production of iron.
  • The bridge is the first of its kind fabricated from cast iron, and one of the few which have survived to the present day and therefore remains an important representative for the beginning of the industrial revolution
  • Construction began in 1779 and the bridge opened on New Year’s Day 1781
  • In 1986, it became part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Location of Ironbridge

Ironbridge is a village on the River Severn, at the heart of the Ironbridge Gorge, in Shropshire, England. It lies in the civil parish of The Gorge, in the borough of Telford and Wrekin. Shropshire is located in the central of England.

To find out more about Ironbridge, click here