Posted in Architecture, England

Archtrove Travels To York – Harry Potter Inspo

York is the place you think of to experience old-school English charm, with its historical references, its quaint and charming streets and its knooks and crannies.

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York Minister

Most famous of its buildings is the York Minister. Proudly sitting in the square with surrounding shops, which would have once been the market, it would have stood over, keeping a watchful eye on the townspeople. It still does.

Young Wizards and York

In recent times, The Shambles has become known to become the home of fictional Diagon Alley from the fabulous written Harry Potter, or at least the inspiration for it causing an abundant of wizardry shops to take hold. To be fair to J.K. Rowling it is not hard to see why the streets of York would not be a place fit for the wizardry world.

Cobbled Streets and York

With its cobbled streets and prehistoric stone monuments, it is not hard to see why it was a nominee for a UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Trawling through these small, narrow streets going off in every direction is no mean feat to encompass for travellers. The city is, as it was in its Roman times.

Stone Walls and York

A sturdy stone wall surrounds the whole of York city centre, one of the longest lasting walls currently occupying Britain. Set a couple of metres higher than the city it makes for a great walk and view of the town.

Architectural Sites in York

  • The Wall
  • The Shambles

 

 

Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

Archtrove Travels To Jewellery Quarter – Brums Hidden Gem

Historically the area of Jewellery Quarter has been the birthplace of many pioneering advancements in industrial technology but since the decline the area resulted in delapidation. One sector that has not declined in the jewellery sector, with numerous shops and a school and the name of course.

Its old school charn still exists in these derelict buildings and wonky roads some of which are protected through conservation work and are as a result grade listed, but some being transformed.

Transforming into a young urban hub for design and tech. And a film site ( ready player one).

Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

5 Buildings That Send Archtrove To Historical Birmingham

Birmingham, as a city has been around for a long time and therefore is no surprise has many historical buildings.

  1. Winterbourne House and Gardens

Winterbourne House and Garden are situated in leafy Edgbaston near the University of Birmingham. It is an early Edwardian 20th-century villa suburban house and garden set in 7 acres. A Grade II listed building, it has housed prominent families and has been known for its illustrious gardens.

2. Black Country Museum

An open-air museum based in Dudley, consisting of 26 acres of historic buildings including a former railway goods yard, canal arm, former coal pits and rebuilt historical buildings. Great for teaching children about the Victorian age what life would have been like.

3. Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum

This Victorian Baroque Museum, is a Grade II listed city centre landmark building housing over 40 galleries with collections, both locally and internationally, ranging from art to history. It first opened in 1885 and has since been famous for its Pre-Raphaelite paintings, the largest public collection in the world. It also reflects on local Birmingham history.

4. Soho House Museum

Soho House is a Grade II* listed 18th-century house in Handsworth. It was the home of Matthew Boulton until his death in 1809. It has now been restored and is now a museum, run by Birmingham Museums Trust, celebrating Boulton’s life and collection. It houses a collection of ormolu, silver, furniture and paintings.

5. Blakesley Hall

Blakesley Hall is a grade II* listed Tudor building in Yardley. It is one of the oldest buildings in Birmingham and is a typical example of Tudor architecture with the use of darkened timber and wattle-and-daub infill, with an external lime render which is painted white. The hall became a museum in 1935 after centuries of use as a private home and its parlour was renovated. Its purpose was to display the history of the local medieval manors which comprise Birmingham.

6. Selly Manor

Selly Manor is a timber cruck-framed, 14th-century building, in England, dating back to at least 1327. Originally the manor house of the village of Bournbrook in Worcestershire, it was relocated to the nearby Bournville district in the early 20th century. It is now operated as a museum and venue for functions including weddings, for which it is licensed. It houses the Laurence Cadbury furniture collection.

7. Highbury Hall

Highbury is a Grade II* listed building, was commissioned as his Birmingham residence by Joseph Chamberlain in 1878. It received its name from the Highbury area of London, where Chamberlain lived as a child. The house incorporates much terracotta decoration. Adjacent to the house was Chamberlain’s famous orchid houses. The gardens were magnificent and included a lake.

8. Council Hall

The Birmingham City Council House is located in Victoria Square in the city centre and is a Grade II* listed building. The side of the building, which faces Chamberlain Square, is the entrance and façade of the Museum and Art Gallery which is partly housed in the same building. It provides office accommodation for both employed council officers, including the Chief Executive, and elected council members, plus the council chamber, Lord Mayor’s Suite, committee rooms and a large and ornate banqueting suite, complete with minstrel’s gallery. The first-floor’s exterior balcony is used by visiting dignitaries and victorious sports teams, to address crowds assembled below.

9. St Philips Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Saint Philip is the Church of England cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Birmingham. Built as a parish church and consecrated in 1715, St Philip’s became the cathedral of the newly formed Diocese of Birmingham in 1905. St Philip’s was built in the early 18th century in the Baroque style by Thomas Archer and is located in Colmore Row, Birmingham, England. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building.

  1. Birmingham University

The University of Birmingham is a public research university located in Edgbaston. The main campus of the university occupies a site some 3 miles south-west of Birmingham city centre, in Edgbaston. It is arranged around Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower. Chamberlain may be considered the founder of Birmingham University and was largely responsible for the university gaining its Royal Charter in 1900 and for the development of the Edgbaston campus. The university’s Great Hall is located in the domed Aston Webb Building. The initial 25-acre site was given to the university in 1900 by Lord Calthorpe.

To find out more about Birmingham, click here.

Posted in Architecture, England

Archtrove Travels To Ironbridge – The First Iron Bridge in the World

Ironbridge is a 30 metre cast iron bridge built across the River Severn in 1779. It sits in the village of Ironbridge in the heart of the gorge, in Shropshire. It is the longest bridge to made of Iron at the time and is therefore known as beginning of the industrial revolution. Now it is open for all to visit, as well as a museum and shop.

What Need to Know About ….. Ironbridge, Telford

  • Known as the Industrial Revolution due to the perfection of the technique of smelting iron with coke, in Coalbrookdale, allowing much cheaper production of iron.
  • The bridge is the first of its kind fabricated from cast iron, and one of the few which have survived to the present day and therefore remains an important representative for the beginning of the industrial revolution
  • Construction began in 1779 and the bridge opened on New Year’s Day 1781
  • In 1986, it became part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Location of Ironbridge

Ironbridge is a village on the River Severn, at the heart of the Ironbridge Gorge, in Shropshire, England. It lies in the civil parish of The Gorge, in the borough of Telford and Wrekin. Shropshire is located in the central of England.

To find out more about Ironbridge, click here

 

Posted in Architecture, England

Archtrove Travels To Shropshire – the birthplace of the industrial revolution

Shropshire is a county in the West Midlands, England. It borders Powys and Wrexham in Wales, Cheshire, Staffordshire, Worcestershire and Herefordshire. The county’s population and the economy are centred on the main towns of Shrewsbury and Telford. The county has many market towns, including Whitchurch, Newport and Market Drayton.

The Ironbridge Gorge area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, covering Ironbridge, Coalbrookdale and a part of Madeley. There are other historic industrial sites in the county, such as at Shrewsbury, Broseley, Snailbeach and Highley, as well as the Union Canal.

The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty covers about a quarter of the county, mainly in the south. Shropshire is one of England’s most rural and sparsely populated counties, with a population density of 350 sq miles. The Wrekin is one of the most famous natural landmarks in the county, though the highest hills are the Clee Hills, Stiperstones and the Long Mynd. Wenlock Edge is another significant geographical and geological landmark. In the low-lying northwest of the county overlapping the border with Wales is the Fenn’s, Whixall and Bettisfield Mosses National Nature Reserve, one of the most important and best-preserved bogs in Britain. The River Severn, Great Britain’s longest river, runs through the county, exiting into Worcestershire via the Severn Valley. Shropshire is landlocked and with an area of 1,346 sq miles is England’s largest inland county. The county flower is the round-leaved sundew.

Key Highlights of Shropshire

In Ironbridge – the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution and one of two World Heritage Sites that bless the county – you will find, set within the gorgeous Severn Valley, 10 hands-on museums that will both enlighten and entertain.

Ludlow is not just beautiful it’s delicious! Its gastronomic capital sits within the famous Blue Remembered Hills of the south of the county and is a great place to find your inner foodie.

Much Wenlock, whose local games actually inspired the creation of the modern Olympics, offers an Olympic trail to explain this momentous achievement. Whilst the meres and canals of north Shropshire gives a gentle, more contemplative experience within a truly rural setting.

Gallery of Shropshire

Blog Posts of Shropshire

Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England

Archtrove Travels To Compton Verney – NT find

What Need to Know About ….. Compton Verney, Warwickshire

Compton Verney is a Grade I listed house built in 1714 by Richard Verney, 11th Baron Willoughby de Broke. It was first extensively extended by George Verney, 12th Baron Willoughby de Broke in the early 18th century and then remodelled and the interiors redesigned by Robert Adam for John Verney, the 14th baron, in the 1760s. It is set in more than 120 acres (0.49 km2) of parkland landscaped by Lancelot “Capability” Brown in 1769.

The house and its 5,079-acre (20.55 km2) estate was sold by Richard Greville Verney, the 19th baron, in 1921 to soap magnate Joseph Watson who was elevated to the peerage as 1st Baron Manton of Compton Verney only two months before his death in March 1922 from a heart attack whilst out hunting with the Warwickshire Foxhounds at nearby Upper Quinton. George Miles Watson, 2nd Baron Manton sold the property to Samuel Lamb. It was requisitioned by the Army during World War II and became vacant when the war ended.

In 1993 it was bought in a run-down state by the Peter Moores Foundation, a charity supporting music and the visual arts established by former Littlewoods chairman Sir Peter Moores. The property was restored to a gallery capable of hosting international exhibitions. Compton Verney Art Gallery is now run by Compton Verney House Trust, a registered charity.

The collections include Neapolitan art from 1600 to 1800; Northern European medieval art from 1450–1650; British portraits including paintings of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and Edward VI and works by Joshua Reynolds; Chinese bronzes including objects from the Neolithic and Shang periods; British folk art; and the Enid Marx / Margaret Lambert Collection of folk art from around the world which inspired the textile designs of 20th century artist Enid Marx.

Location of The Compton Verney

Compton Verney House is an 18th-century country mansion at Compton Verney near Kineton in Warwickshire, England, which has been converted to house the Compton Verney Art Gallery.

Gallery for Compton Verney

To find out more click here

 

Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England, Warwickshire

Archtrove Travels To Coughton Court – NT find

The house has a long crenelated façade directly facing the main road, at the centre of which is the Tudor Gatehouse, dating from 1530; this has hexagonal turrets and oriel windows in the English Renaissance style. The gatehouse is the oldest part of the house and is flanked by later wings, in the Strawberry Hill Gothic style, popularised by Horace Walpole.

What Need to Know About ….. Coughton Court, Warwickshire

  • The Coughton estate has been owned by the Throckmorton family since 1409. The estate was acquired through marriage to the De Spinney family. Coughton was rebuilt by Sir George Throckmorton, the first son of Sir Robert Throckmorton of Coughton Court by Catherine Marrow, daughter of William Marrow of London.
  • The great gatehouse at Coughton was dedicated to King Henry VIII by Throckmorton, a favorite of the King. Throckmorton would become notorious due to his almost fatal involvement in the divorce between King Henry and his first wife Catherine of Aragon.
  • Throckmorton favoured the queen and was against the Reformation. Throckmorton spent most of his life rebuilding Coughton. In 1549, when he was planning the windows in the great hall, he asked his son Nicholas to obtain from the heralds the correct tricking (colour abbreviations) of the arms of his ancestors’ wives and his own cousin and niece by marriage Queen Catherine Parr.
  • The costly recusancy (refusal to attend Anglican Church services) of Robert Throckmorton and his heirs restricted later rebuilding, so that much of the house still stands largely as he left it.
  • The gatehouse at Coughton was built at the earliest in 1536, as it is built of stones which came from Bordesley Abbey and Evesham Abbey after the Dissolution of the Monasteries Act in 1536. Similar to other Tudor houses, it was built around a courtyard, with the gatehouse used for deliveries and coaches to travel through to the courtyard. The courtyard was completely closed in on all four sides by around 1651, when during the English Civil War of 1642-1651, the fourth wing (what would be the east wing if it stood today) was burnt by Parliamentary soldiers, along with many of the Throckmorton’s family papers. After the Roman Catholic Relief Act was passed in 1829, the Throckmorton family were able to afford large-scale building works, so the west front was remodelled after 1829.
  • The house was used as a filming location for Father Brown (2013 TV series) in the episode The Mask of the Demon.

Location of Coughton Court

Coughton Court is an English Tudor country house, situated on the main road between Studley and Alcester in Warwickshire. It is a Grade I listed building.

Gallery for Coughton Court

Blog Posts of Coughton Court