Posted in Architecture, Birmingham, England, Warwickshire

Archtrove Travels To Coughton Court – NT find

The house has a long crenelated façade directly facing the main road, at the centre of which is the Tudor Gatehouse, dating from 1530; this has hexagonal turrets and oriel windows in the English Renaissance style. The gatehouse is the oldest part of the house and is flanked by later wings, in the Strawberry Hill Gothic style, popularised by Horace Walpole.

What Need to Know About ….. Coughton Court, Warwickshire

  • The Coughton estate has been owned by the Throckmorton family since 1409. The estate was acquired through marriage to the De Spinney family. Coughton was rebuilt by Sir George Throckmorton, the first son of Sir Robert Throckmorton of Coughton Court by Catherine Marrow, daughter of William Marrow of London.
  • The great gatehouse at Coughton was dedicated to King Henry VIII by Throckmorton, a favorite of the King. Throckmorton would become notorious due to his almost fatal involvement in the divorce between King Henry and his first wife Catherine of Aragon.
  • Throckmorton favoured the queen and was against the Reformation. Throckmorton spent most of his life rebuilding Coughton. In 1549, when he was planning the windows in the great hall, he asked his son Nicholas to obtain from the heralds the correct tricking (colour abbreviations) of the arms of his ancestors’ wives and his own cousin and niece by marriage Queen Catherine Parr.
  • The costly recusancy (refusal to attend Anglican Church services) of Robert Throckmorton and his heirs restricted later rebuilding, so that much of the house still stands largely as he left it.
  • The gatehouse at Coughton was built at the earliest in 1536, as it is built of stones which came from Bordesley Abbey and Evesham Abbey after the Dissolution of the Monasteries Act in 1536. Similar to other Tudor houses, it was built around a courtyard, with the gatehouse used for deliveries and coaches to travel through to the courtyard. The courtyard was completely closed in on all four sides by around 1651, when during the English Civil War of 1642-1651, the fourth wing (what would be the east wing if it stood today) was burnt by Parliamentary soldiers, along with many of the Throckmorton’s family papers. After the Roman Catholic Relief Act was passed in 1829, the Throckmorton family were able to afford large-scale building works, so the west front was remodelled after 1829.
  • The house was used as a filming location for Father Brown (2013 TV series) in the episode The Mask of the Demon.

Location of Coughton Court

Coughton Court is an English Tudor country house, situated on the main road between Studley and Alcester in Warwickshire. It is a Grade I listed building.

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Posted in Architecture, England

Archtrove Travels To Britain – with the National Trust

The National Trust is a charity organisation for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty in Britain found in 1895. The premises is to protect the heritage and open spaces so that it is enjoyable for all. It covers, England, Wales and Northern Irelands, Scotland have there own. The large majority are English country houese but it also protects natural beauty sites such as Lake District, urban properties and nature reserves. Also includes, stately home, historic house, castle, abbey, museum. These properties are easily accesible by the public, for a small charge.

What is part of the National Trust:
  • 775 miles of coastline
  • Over 248,000 hectares of land
  • Over 500 historic houses, castles, ancient monuments gardens and parks and nature reserves.
  • Close to one million objects and works of art

National Trust Properties include:

Warwickshire

Charlcote Park

Baddesley Clinton

Coughton Court

Tip: If you live in Britain it is worth getting a membership as this works out cheaper and you are more likely to visit these beautiful sites and discover something that you did not know existed.

Find out more about National Trust here